The Roskamp Institute investigates the role of anatabine in lowering Alzheimer’s Abeta levels.

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The Roskamp Institute has had a long-term interest in finding new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. Central to the goal of the institute is finding new ways to lower the accumulation of Alzheimers Abeta peptide in the brain. Drs. Michael Mullan and Daniel Paris and colleague investigated the role of an extract of tobacco, known as anatabine in the production and accumulation of the Alzheimer Abeta peptide. Paris and Mullan and colleagues showed that anatabine did lower the production of the Alzheimers Abeta peptide in cell culture — in cells genetically engineered to produce the Alzheimers Abeta peptide. In addition, they showed that al  in an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease which overproduces the Alzheimers  Abeta peptide, anatabine was able to lower the accumulation of amyloid in the brain. The paper cited below that resulted from this work was published in the European Journal of Pharmacology in September of 2011. Collectively, the work suggests that anatabine, a naturally occurring tobacco product and one which occurs in other plants and is in the human food chain, may have potential beneficial effects in Alzheimer’s disease.

The Roskamp Institute, headed by Drs. Michael Mullan and Fiona Crawford is dedicated to finding new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. Drs. Mullan and Crawford were among those who first showed that certain early onset forms of Alzheimer’s are caused by accumulation of Alzheimers Abeta peptide. These findings contributed to the worldwide use of models of Alzheimer’s disease which contain human mutant amyloid precursor protein.

Eur J Pharmacol. 2011 Sep 19. [Epub ahead of print] Anatabine lowers Alzheimer’s Aβ production in vitro and in vivo.
Paris D, Beaulieu-Abdelahad D, Bachmeier C, Reed J, Ait-Ghezala G, Bishop A, Chao J, Mathura V, Crawford F, Mullan M.

 

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