Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer Research Identified Various Genetic Variations

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Based in Sarasota, Florida, The Roskamp Institute is a not-for-profit organization. It has dedicated time to finding cures for several neuropsychiatric disorders with a special emphasis on Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In order to develop therapeutic targets which are specific to Alzheimer’s disease etiology, the scientists engaged in current research at Roskamp Institute focus on dissecting the molecular biological pathways which are associated in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis.

Dr. Michael Mullan is the Director of the Roskamp Institute, and along with his team, he discovered the concept of ‘Swedish mutation’, a genetic error which results in overproduction of beta-amyloid by aberrant proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP).  The concept of Swedish mutation now forms the bases of most mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Many tests and findings by the Roskamp Institute resulted in several therapeutic prospects for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease as well as Cancer.

The Roskamp Institute has contributed greatly by providing research on the treatments of several neuropsychiatric disorders like traumatic brain injury, substance abuse, and Alzheimer, etc. With the guidance and knowledge provided by Dr. Mullan, the institute tested many causes and correlations between Alzheimer’s disease and proteins present in human brain. With Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research, several types of genetic variations, which can be the cause of Alzheimer’s, have been identified. It was discovered that the central reason to the disease process is a small protein identified as the ß (beta)-amyloid. Although, this protein is present normally in the human brain, but at times excess or abnormal accumulation can result in Alzheimer’s disease. With Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research, the institute tests cutting edge cures, therapeutic treatments and medications to slow down the process of toxic ß-amyloid accumulation.

Dr Mullan’s Alzheimer research proves that Aβ peptide prevents blood vessel growth and eventually inhibits tumor growth in brain. To identify if Aβ has the same effect with short derivatives, he studied various sequences within the Alzheimer’s Aβ peptide which have potential therapeutic relevance in preventing tumor growth. Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research work has contributed exceptionally to the field to help understand the disease and find its cures. Find out more about his Alzheimer research works, by browsing through www.rfdn.org or www.mullanalzheimer.com or www.mullanalzheimer.info.